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To the wonder & beyond

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Greetings again from the darkness. Director Terrence Malick makes films that typically fall into the “love it or hate it” genre. He has a very loyal group of fans (of which I am one) who appreciate the unique mental and emotional ride that his projects provide. To say that his films are not accessible is understandable. His objective is to challenge you to access your own beliefs and thoughts, rather than the characters in his movies … they are simply the tools he uses.

Less than two years ago, I was struggling to put thoughts into words after watching Malick’s The Tree of Life. Now, in record time for him, he releases another film that is even more impressionistic … actually abstract is not too strong a description. The usual Malick elements are present – nature, uncomfortable relationships, minimal dialogue, breathtaking photography, and powerful music. Where The Tree of Life focused on Creation and Family, this latest takes on Love and Faith.

Water imagery is a frequent key as we see the personal relationship mimic the changing of the seasons. Neil (Ben Affleck), an American visiting Paris, meets and falls for Marina (Olga Kurylenko), a free-spirited local filled with light and energy. Their love affair moves to the stunning Mont Saint-Michel before settling in the drab plains of Bartlesville, Oklahoma.

It’s not surprising that the relationship suffers as the newness wears thin. The interesting part is how Malick presents it. We mostly witness bits and pieces … he shows us moments, not events. We easily see that Neil’s aloofness and sullen looks don’t jibe with Marina’s effervescence. When she returns to Paris, Neil easily falls in with an old flame played by Rachel McAdams. When she later accuses him of making what they had “nothing”, we all understand what she means … and why.

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While Neil is proving what a lost soul he is, we also meet Father Quintana (Javier Bardem). He has lost the light of his faith and is in full crisis mode, even as he attempts to console and guide Marina. There is no secret that much of this film is autobiographical and that Malick is working through wounds he still carries these many years later. As a movie-goer, there is little to be gained from Alleck’s disconnected character or from Kurylenko dancing in the rain. The real prize is awakening the thoughts and feelings many of us probably buried over the years to hide emotional pain. Malick seems to be saying that it’s OK to acknowledge your foundation, regardless of your ability to succeed in a socially acceptable manner.

If you prefer not to dig so deep emotionally, this is a beautiful film to look at – thanks to Director of Photograpy Emmanuel Lubezki (a frequent Malick collaborator), and listen to – a blended soundtrack with many notable pieces from various composers. While this will be remembered as Roger Ebert’s final movie review (he liked it very much), it will likely have very little appeal to the average movie watcher – and I’m confident that Terrence Malick is fine with that.

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The Weekly Buzz: The Birthday Week

Yes, it was. Less of throttle more of spenditure. Anyway, an amazing week. It was April 9. But I started my week rather with something classic in nature. Visited a friend’s father who was collector of old radios. He adored his radios so much that he have them framed in a glass and did not want anyone to picture them even. But it was Me, nonetheless, who cant resist taking a picture anyway of a 1956 Siemens Radio. Yeah collection was that old! Here is the pic:

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I was kidnapped by some friends, some of them are as weird as me (admitting), at 11 and exactly at 12 we were in a local Pizza Store to celebrate my Birthday. They had ordered a strange looking cake which I couldn’t even read at first as it did not have my name inscribed. Looked like friends turned “racist monsters”  this time and had written Saeen instead my name. Saeen is actually a word used for Sindhi Landlords and due to its popularity because of this song (

I was kidnapped by some friends, some of them are as weird as me (admitting), at 11 and exactly at 12 we were in a local Pizza Store to celebrate my Birthday. They had ordered a strange looking cake which I couldn’t even read at first as it did not have my name inscribed. Looked like friends turned “racist monsters”  this time and had written Saeen instead my name. Saeen is actually a word used for Sindhi Landlords and due to its popularity because of this song (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gooNwUEXAE) they call me Saeen. I am not actually a landlord, trust me government I am not. Here is the cake though!!Image

On a brighter note, I got a gift from them. Its actually something I was in badly need of. The Amazing iPad Mini. Yes, Mini is Mighty. Love you all.

In the later part of the weekend I was planning a movie with some friends but due to some “unforeseen” reasons couldn’t go. But my movie-buds did bother me to watch something, just for the sake of it. And here is what I watched:

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David O Russle has made movies that are quite brilliant as a whole cinematic experience. I started noticing and following his movies since I watched The Fighter in 2010, it was an epic. Silver Linings Playbook is a well crafted film when it comes to screen writing, screenplay, acting and direction. Cinematography could have been better in some scenes but as a whole the movie was awesome. Jennifer Lawrence, The Hunger Games fame, is beautiful and acted really well, won the Oscar for that too. Bradley Cooper really outshined his role as a recovering bi-polar patient, never categorized him as a serious actor before this movie. The ending wasn’t disappointed, the thing I always expect from a movie or novel.

This is it for this week. Next week is quite important, personally speaking, have to decide something really serious. Mum is travelling back to see kids which means I’ll be alone for a week or two. Will finish almost every single book in my shelf, yes that’s  precisely the objective.

See you next week, till then Ta ta..

P.S. Don’t take my fictional writings seriously J

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